Sunday, October 17, 2010

And she'll have fun, fun, fun till the doctor takes her palate away....

Gracious, there's a lot to do before you go into surgery. I mean, *really*.

I've been approved (thank you kindly, Mister Blue Cross) for two whole days in the hospital. That means that I have to pack two whole days' worth of pajammies and decent soap and so on, and make arrangements for the Zoats to go to PuppyCamp next door.

I've got my medical POA and living will and donation instructions all set up, just in case. I've paid the bills and got a list of things to do before Wednesday. I have enough cat food to feed an army. Everything is pretty much done, except the laundry that's in the dryer.

Think, think, think. Must think of things I might not be thinking of. Sheesh.

21 comments:

Anonymous said...

Throw away anything that will go bad in your fridge. Have stuff you'll be able to warm up and eat prepared. Have a notebook to keep track of what meds you took when- being stoned can lead to double dosing. Have DVDs and new books in the house. Record yourself saying something like "I had surgery and can't speak well but I hear you" to play into the phone.

And finally, know that you're heading into something big and ugly, but that you'll keep barelling through the sucky part to the recovery part. You're cool and unique- the universe ain't done with you yet.

Cartoon Characters said...

And as much as it isn't great to be having to worry about it...when you get your billings - do a cross check on the charges:
http://www.healthcarebluebook.com/page_Default.aspx

And if it is too much to handle, you can let someone else do the work for you:
http://www.copaysolutions.com/

And no, I don't work for these websites/companies. I live in Canada where I don't have to worry about any of this, but apparently people have saved a lot of money using these sites.

Good luck for your surgery on the 20th.

kathyr said...

Newspapers? Mail?

Oh, good luck!

me said...

I'll be holding you close in my heart on Wednesday ~

Anonymous said...

What excellent ideas.

Hot water bottles, rice bags, cold packs? Bubble bath. Anything else warm-fuzzy and comforting.

Ibuprofen (yeah I know there will hopefully be good drugs, but anti-inflammatories on top might be good if allowed).

Sounds like a tough time, but you sound like a tough lady.

tm

SRR said...

I definitely second having a notebook to track medications. I've had 5 surgeries over the last couple years, and writing down your meds immediately is a lifesaver. Also, how about an easy to use portable timer you set to remind you of your next dose (it is a lot easier than setting your alarm clock). You are a nurse so you probably know this, but don't be afraid of those pain meds. Keep on top of your pain, it lets your body use that energy for healing, rather than coping with the pain.

Start eating high fiber stuff now, maybe even start earlier with those stool softeners.

One thing I did before one of my major surgeries was I went to Sephora and bought a really cool personal care item that I would never pay that much for any other time. In my case it was a facial scrub. It was my treat to myself. Something like a perfume you love, or bubble bath, or scented lotion.

Very best wishes on your surgery!

Susan

distracted by shiny objects said...

Nothing from me except sending prayers your way--for the whole lot of you. Phlebotomists and transporters to surgeon and anesthesiologist. May a good job be done by all! break a leg, girlie! :>)

Silliyak said...

Best of luck, it sucks that this is happening to you, but I hope something good comes from it (other than getting better)

Anonymous said...

When someone asks "What can I do?" let them change your bed and wash/dry/fold the sheets. If you're haning about in the bed a lot, clean sheets every other day are really nice.

Bardiac said...

Wishing you the best possible results on Wednesday.

Thirddegreenurse said...

All good advice. Whiteboard for writing note. Wear glasses? Don't forget those! Cell PHONE CHARGER.


And no matter what, if you're at all fussy about pillows, take a comfy one to the hospital. And your favorite blankie if you have one. Slippers and PJ's because most hospitals' are cheap and crappy.

And yeah, double check those charrges. Later, much later.

Consider yourself nurse-hugged.

Thirddegreenurse said...

All good advice. Whiteboard for writing note. Wear glasses? Don't forget those! Cell PHONE CHARGER.


And no matter what, if you're at all fussy about pillows, take a comfy one to the hospital. And your favorite blankie if you have one. Slippers and PJ's because most hospitals' are cheap and crappy.

And yeah, double check those charrges. Later, much later.

Consider yourself nurse-hugged.

messymimi said...

Give someone the password to get in here and give us the word everything is okay after, if you want to. I know I would be glad to hear sooner rather than later.

Lots of prayers.

Lynda Halliger-Otvos said...

Sending hugs, energy and healing vibes to you. I second, or third, the writing of the meds as you take them; i use the alarm function on my phone which is (hopefully) always close by me, it will set three separate times for me.

I will bait my breath with squid while I wait for news about you. Best to you, my nurse blog-bud.

Lurkette said...

I've been trying to reply to this and a couple of previous posts, but can't because I am swamped and flooded with memories of the days before my first cancer surgery.

I made lists,
packed bags,
activated support systems,
bought notebooks and pens,
bought an extra cellphone charger,
paper toilet seat covers to use in the hospital,
disposable paper undies for the hospital...
and then I ran out of stuff to do
so I scrubbed all the floors
on my hands and knees,
cleaned out the insides of all my cupboards,
washed the windows,
vacuumed my mattress and turned it,
anything, anything.

What I do know? I know you are a fantastic, strong, realistic woman. "Realistic optimism" is the motto of my oncology institute, and you seem to have an abundant supply of that.

You are so close to me in my thoughts and prayers.

Hugs and lots of good energy from Jerusalem directly to you.

Anonymous said...

I wrote a Thank you card before surgery, tells my other half to let visitors read when they come see me for I'll be tired, groggy, moody or teary, & tells them because of the pain, the surgery & what I had to lose, not to cry in front of me or feel sorry for me :D and f**k the cancer !

wish you well.

CQ said...

Best wishes, Jo. You have all you need, try to relax. It sounds like you have plenty of helpers nearby. And Frog knows how many well wishers you have on the planet.

Clairemum said...

You sound as ready as you can be. Lots of healing energy and good thoughts to you and your treatment team.

Eileen said...

Just remember to be patient and the patient - not the nurse - until you feel less sore, weepy and just yuk. That's the advice cos you're a medical person - we're far too stoical usually. And the other bit linked (cos you'll forget) is take the pain relief - don't let them let it wear off too much. A friend who started doing anaesthesiology but stopped and then did general practice said the most important thing that taught him for the rest of his medical life was to GIVE PROPER PAIN RELIEF. His boss was adamant about it - he reckoned that a pain-free recovery was the most important part of the patient experience and drummed it into all his students. Learn to say yes please if you need to.

All the very best, will be thinking of you on Wednesday - provided I can get the time difference right! Do you have a time yet or is it a case of waiting in line?

wv - ructio. Don't know if you have the word in the US. Just don't go causing any ructions amongst the rest of the patients and staff!!!!! Means rumpuses, trouble.

Ewa said...

I hope you will feel all the good vibes and love coming your way on Wednesday.
During my surgery I was dreaming about hiking the most beautiful mountains. Maybe you will have a wonderful dream also.
Hugs.

Anonymous said...

1. Give keys to your closest friends so you don't have to get up and answer the door when they come to see you.

2. Email everyone you know well in your neighborhood or town to get recommendations for a maid. You might, at some point in your recovery, want your house cleaned but not have the energy to do it yourself. You'll want to have a name and number already determined.